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This MF 3095 was purchased from Parris Tractors. Described as a superb sunshine tractor for light duties, it joins the MF 3065 (below) as the farm’s primary raking and tedding tractors.
This MF 3095 was purchased from Parris Tractors. Described as a superb sunshine tractor for light duties, it joins the MF 3065 (below) as the farm’s primary raking and tedding tractors.
3095 2

“We also have a two-wheel drive 3065 Autotronic (85hp) which we bought for dad on his 70th birthday six-years ago,” adds Mr Rees. “This is also a superb tractor for sunshine jobs like tedding and raking, plus it is very manoeuvrable.”

 

Equipped with MF’s 32F by 32R gearbox featuring a two-speed splitter, the Perkins-powered four-cylinder 3065 is another fine example of what was one of the most technologically advanced tractor ranges produced in the late-Eighties and early-Nineties.

 

Buying older tractors as working investments is an increasingly popular trend for many mid-sized farmers. However, when it comes to parting with your hard-earned brass, the purchase of a tractor built in yesteryear can also make financial sense.

 

The Rees family’s Coventry-built 4255 (95hp) has been on the farm for nearly 18 years. Equipped with an MF loader, up until a few years ago, it was the farm’s primary materials handler. When the family purchased the tractor in 2003, it had clocked just 70 hours. By 2006, this figure had escalated to 3,000 hours, prompting the family to do a deal and trade it in for a new tractor.

 

Andrew Rees says: “When Dad and I went to our local dealer, they wanted £20k and the 4255 for a brand new tractor. At the time I discovered we could buy a newer second hand 4355 (100hp) with lower hours for £22k. So that is what we did. For an additional £2,000 we had two tractors instead of one, and both of them are still used on the farm today.”

The Rees family uses two Merlo handlers for materials handling. The Merlo handlers are described as the busiest machines on the farm which milks 160-cows and runs 200 mule breeding sheep.
The Rees family uses two Merlo handlers for materials handling. The Merlo handlers are described as the busiest machines on the farm which milks 160-cows and runs 200 mule breeding sheep.
This 1966 MF135 with an ATV sprayer mounted on the back, for spot-spraying docks and thistles in the pastures. According to Andrew Rees’ father, Mr Ken Rees, every farm should have one.
This 1966 MF135 with an ATV sprayer mounted on the back, for spot-spraying docks and thistles in the pastures. According to Andrew Rees’ father, Mr Ken Rees, every farm should have one.

While the dairy herd benefits from modern electronic technology when it comes to milking and administering feed rations, technology only plays a very small role when it comes to tractor driving. Here a Trimble light bar is the only techno-system, which is used for guidance when they are fertilising grass.

 

In terms of maintaining their kit, tractor driver Matthew Langrick handles most of the day-to-day maintenance, with additional support from agricultural engineer Mick Judd who works for nearby Chandlers if things get too technical.

 

“I like to think our working fleet of tractors are money in the bank,” says Andrew Rees. “The number of tractors we have gives us exceptional flexibility. They also suffer less depreciation and our machinery costs are actually no higher than those of other dairy farmer’s I talk to in our local discussion group, who choose to run fewer tractors which are newer models.

 

“Besides being working machines, you could also say these tractors are my hobby. If I am honest, I often wonder if the diesel tractor of yesteryear will suffer the same fate of the steam engine and suddenly become a technologically redundant environmental dinosaur. I suppose one day we will find out, but I am not going to worry about that until it happens.”

The Rees’ farm fleet

The Rees’ farm fleet

Year

Model

Hours

1963

MF 35X

N/A

1966

MF 135

2,000

1988

MF 390

6,800

1993

MF 3065

5,000

1993

MF 3095

7,000

2000

MF 4255

5,500

2002

MF 4355

3,000

2004

MF 6290

5,000

2009

MF 6480

5,500

2012

MF 6480

3,500

2016

MF 7718

2,100

1996

MF 32 (Combine Harvester)

2,000

Farm facts

Dairy farmer Andrew Rees is pictured with his wife and business partner Abigail. The Rees family have been tenants on the Wyggeston Hospital Trust estate in Leicestershire since 1960.
Dairy farmer Andrew Rees is pictured with his wife and business partner Abigail. The Rees family have been tenants on the Wyggeston Hospital Trust estate in Leicestershire since 1960.
  • Name: Gaulby Lodge Farm
  • Location: Leicester
  • Farmed area: 218 hectares
  • Type: Dairy, sheep and arable

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