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Kubota

Kubota

Kubota was the first manufacturer to receive AEF certification for both tractor and implement, with its latest M7003 Series tractor range and the BV5160 variable chamber round baler with IsoBus connectivity.

 

“We are looking to carry out extensive demonstrations in the UK this year along with Kubota, using a TIM-equipped M7173 tractor and BV5160 baler combination,” says David Furber, UK sales manager for the Kverneland Group, which manufactures the Kubota-branded BV5160 variable chamber round baler.

 

“By taking out the repetitive tasks associated with round baling, we’re expecting to see a reduction in operator fatigue, while overall efficiency and quality improves,” he says.

Case IH

Case IH

Case IH has travelled a similar path with round and square balers, and also implemented TIM on its Maxxum CVX and Puma CVX tractors with electronic hydraulic remote valves.

 

Round baler automation with a TIM-activated tractor should see RB455 and RB465 balers capable of stopping the tractor, applying net wrap, opening the tailgate, ejecting the bale and closing the tailgate – all without operator intervention.

 

Available on net-only balers, automation requires a bale presence switch and bale ramp, so the control system can detect the current position of the bale.

 

Case IH’s LB424 and LB434 big square balers also benefit from feed rate control, achieved by the baler determining changes in forward speed of the tractor.

 

“The operator can select between charge control and slice control modes,” explains Case IH product marketing specialist Paul Freeman. “Charge control measures throughput of the crop being fed into the pre-compression chamber, along with time for filling the feeder channel and adjusts the tractor speed to achieve optimum capacity.

 

“With slice control, the tractor’s speed is adapted to be based on slice thickness, and will strive to obtain a user-defined amount of slices for a set bale length.”

Deutz-Fahr

Deutz-Fahr

SDF says TIM is only available for Stage 4 and 5 compliant Deutz-Fahr TTV tractors. While control buttons have been in place on Lauingen-built tractors since the introduction of Stage 4 models, software activation is required by the dealer and is linked to the tractor VIN.

 

“Ground speed, electronic remotes, front and rear three-point linkage, steering and pto operation is possible through an appropriate TIM-activated implement,” says SDF product and precision farming specialist, David Jefferson. “The capability is there, but activation comes at a cost.”

Implement manufacturers

Implement manufacturers

Grimme is currently trialling systems to work on trailed potato harvesters to optimize harvester loading, while Krone is pushing ahead with round baler control on the Comprima models, which is a development that stemmed from its early experiments with the Ultima non-stop baler.

 

Pottinger has been working to develop a TIM-compatible power harrow which offers a system called Seedbed Control. Still being tested, Seedbed Control automatically adjusts the forward speed and pto speed of the tractor, based on clod images ‘seen’ by an on-board camera.

Lemken

Lemken

Lemken hopes to be demonstrating its iQblue control set, which confirms to the AEF TIM standard, on its ploughs and cultivators later this year.

 

“We are intending to fit a system to one of our ploughs, so that TIM can be used to manage variable furrow width and front furrow width, when linked to a TIM tractor with GPS and auto-steering,” explains Lemken UK general manager Paul Creasy.

 

“And a similar system is planned for our Karat 9 and 12 trailed cultivators equipped with Contour Track. This will allow the frame to automatically pivot longitudinally to maintain an even cultivation depth over the length of the implement, on undulating ground.”

Growing list

Growing list

The list of manufacturers continues to grow. Krone, Grimme, Kubota, Pottinger, Lemken and Kverneland Group are among those continuing to develop TIM technology that can optimise implement efficiency, while SDF and AGCO are all creating versions of the technology.

 

However, Deere has followed its own route since 2011, with a control system it calls tractor implement automation (TIA), but has recently come to the AEF table to meet the wider industry compliant TIM protocol.

 

TIM is available on Deere’s 6R tractors from model year 2017, and requires a supplementary activation to be carried out, to unlock software for which a fee must be paid.

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